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Lloyd Loom - a braid with history

 

Lloyd Loom - created in America, developed in Europe

 

The history of the Lloyd Loom braid dates back to 1917. Then it was patented by Marshall B. Lloyd from the United States. Named from his name, he served him to create unusual chairs, which captivated their unusual texture. Lloyd Loom chairs quickly gained popularity throughout the country, but in 1921 their originator sold the rights to the fabric to the British company Lusta & Sons. In her studios from the braid, furniture with a structure simpler than the original design was created. In the 1930s, Lloyd Loom furniture decorated the interior of hundreds of hotels, a tea room restaurants, cruise ships and even on board Zeppelin. Before 1940, a total of over 10 million pieces of furniture covered with braid were created!

 

Lloyd Loom - a braid with history

 

 

Unique properties of the braid

 

Lloyd Loom braid, due to its clearly visible, even weave and high strength, was used for many years primarily for the production of furniture with external use. It was great as a material for garden furniture. Its properties were also used in other branches of the furniture industry. Today, also thanks to Berke.home, you can also enjoy Lloyd Loom in your bedroom. The braid we use is created naturally, from selected species of tree. A special weaving technique gives it an extremely delicate structure and texture, and at the same time above average durability, much better than wicker furniture. Thanks to the possibility of colored braid, we offer our clients furniture in a wide range of colors. The water varnishes, which are covered with braid, are fully ecological and non -toxic. This means that furniture with Lloyd Loom braid can be used without fear in bedrooms and children's rooms.

 

Lloyd Loom - a braid with history

 

Are you interested in the history and properties of the braid? Check out today, for the production of which we used the unique Lloyd Loom material. We invite you to familiarize yourself with the collections: Ardea, Bari, Como, Florence, Genoa, Livorno, Marino, Roma, Saline, Siena, Sorano and Trento.